Michelin Star 2019

"The Asian-inspired menu is truly exciting, for Chen is a master at weaving together a surprising roster of delicious ingredients to craft a uniquely layered dish.”

michelin guide

 

Nothing But Hits at East Village Newcomer Tuome

“Really, you could pick dishes at random off the menu and be not only satisfied, but wowed as well. When was the last time you had a meal that was not only delicious, but visually and intellectually exciting?”

eater

 

Tuome Two-Tone: A surprising new Alphabet City fine-dining restaurant

“I love fine dining but hate wearing a suit," says Tuome's chef and owner, Thomas Chen. "I wanted to make refined food in a place where it's okay to wear shorts and flip-flops.”

Tasting table

Review: Tuome

“Tuome isn’t a half-finished assignment cobbled together during a Red Bull-fueled all-nighter. This place did the homework all semester and even got one of those plastic folders to put the term paper in.”

Infatuation

 

 

Tuome in the East Village

“He has terrific control over salt, spices, texture and contrast, weaving them together until you ask, why hasn’t anyone done this before? Adding slick duck fat to packets of Cantonese sticky rice steamed in lotus leaves seems like an obvious good idea. So does the extra crackle he puts into the Chinese sausage bits to save the rice from gummy monotony. But they aren’t obvious until you taste Mr. Chen’s version.”

the new york times

 

At Tuome, Thomas Chen Articulates Eloquent Culinary Sentences in Alphabet City

“It’s a touch of genius, a sheen of buttery richness to counter the starter’s sharp flavors, in particular the XO sauce, a savory Chinese gravy made from a base of dried scallops, that glazes the pork hash. The same creative spark abounds at Tuome — so much so that the Voice awarded it “Best New Restaurant” in this week’s issue."

THE village voice

 

The Best Restaurant Dishes of 2014

"OCTOPUS WITH XO SAUCE AND BROWN-BUTTER ESPUMA AT TUOME The XO sauce is a complicated jumble of sweet and savory, crunch and chew, pork and seafood. The espuma is the opposite: a smooth, rich wave of foamed butter. What they do when they meet is the secret of this dish.”

The New york times